DR. MICHAEL FABRICANT






















The Changing Politics of Education: Privatization and the Dispossessed Lives Left Behind

“This is one of those very rare books on public education and social dispossession that bursts the bounds of its brilliant scholarship and explodes into a soaring call for action. Fine and Fabricant carefully dissect the ideological attack on the public schools, the selling off of public services to the private sector, the marginalization of professional teachers, and the relegation of low-income students to the status of expendables...The book has an electrifying tone. It creates a sense of urgency. I’m profoundly grateful to the authors."

—Jonathan Kozol, Writer, Educator, and Activist


Austerity Blues: Fighting for the Soul of Public Higher Education

by Michael Fabricant, Steve Brier (2016, Johns Hopkins University Press)


"Austerity Blues is a very fine book, well written and well argued. The wide-ranging scope of the topics it covers and its historical perspective are brilliantly synthesized into a compelling narrative indictment of the social and political consequences of disinvestment in higher education. It is a major contribution to knowledge and will be a landmark publication in the debate over the future of public higher education in this country."–David Harvey, City University of New York, author of A Brief History of Neoliberalism


A generation of budget cutting has eviscerated the very idea of public higher education in America.Public higher education in the postwar era was a key economic and social driver in American life, making college available to millions of working men and women. Since the 1980s, however, government austerity policies and politics have severely reduced public investment in higher education, exacerbating inequality among poor and working-class students of color, as well as part-time faculty. In Austerity Blues, Michael Fabricant and Stephen Brier examine these devastating fiscal retrenchments nationally, focusing closely on New York and California, both of which were leaders in the historic expansion of public higher education in the postwar years and now are at the forefront of austerity measures...Click here to read more.


Reviews:

Contemporary Sociology

Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning

Academe

Gotham Center for New York City History

Radical Teacher (pages 45-48)

Times Higher Education

Click here to read more reviews for this book.


Related Podcast:

Countering Austerity Policies at Public Universities, WNYC, The Leonard Lopate Show, November 2016


Related Articles:

Chancellor James Milliken Lays Out New Vision for CUNY, Wall Street Journal, January 2017

Nationwide, state budget cuts disproportionately hit low-income, minority college students, PBS Newshour, January 2017

When College Was a Public Good, The Chronicle of Higher Education, November 2016

Attacking Austerity, Inside Higher Ed, November 2016

Building a Multifaceted Campaign for Public Higher Education, Metropolitics, October 2016

How Cost-Cutting and Austerity Affect Public Higher Education, PSC CUNY, October 2016

Could CUNY be Tuition Free Again, Gotham Gazette, July 2016

Dreams Stall as CUNY, New York City's Engine of Mobility, Sputters, New York Times, May 2016

Don't Dilute CUNY's Urban Mission, New York Times, April 2016



Related Videos:

College Affordability: Will New York Lead the Way? | The New School (Discussion)

County College of Morris (Video Lecture)

California Teachers Association (Video Lecture)


The Changing Politics of Education: Privatization and the Dispossessed Lives Left Behind

by Michael Fabricant, Michelle Fine (2013, Routledge & Kegan Paul)


The authors persuasively argue that the present cascade of reforms to public education is a consequence of a larger intention to shrink government. The startling result is that more of public education s assets and resources are moving to the private sector and to the prison industrial complex. Drawing on various forms of evidence structural, economic, narrative, and youth-generated participatory research the authors reveal new structures and circuits of dispossession and privilege that amount to a clear failure of present policy.


“This is one of those very rare books on public education and social dispossession that bursts the bounds of it brilliant scholarship and explodes into a soaring call for action. Fine and Fabricant carefully dissect the ideological attack upon the public schools, the selling off of public services to the private sector, the marginalization of professional teachers, and the relegation of low-income students to the status of expendables. But the genius of this book lies in its recognition that disinvestment in the public schools and their replacement by selective boutique institutions are serving the purpose for which they were intended: mightily expanding the inequalities of wealth, darkening the futures of the dispossessed, and cannibalizing what remains of democratic spirit in a corporate society. The book ends with strong proposals -- “direct action” and “the reinvention of the work of unions,” among other bold suggestions that are seldom heard from academic authors in this era of retrenchment. The book has an electrifying tone. It creates a sense of urgency. I’m profoundly grateful to the authors.”

–Jonathan Kozol, Writer, Educator, and Activist


Click here to read more reviews for this book.

Charter Schools and the Corporate Makeover of Public Education: What's at Stake?

by Michael Fabricant, Michelle Fine, Deborah Meier (Foreword) (2012)


This book will reset the discourse on charter schooling by systematically exploring the gap between the promise and the performance of charter schools. The authors do not defend the public school system, which for decades has failed primarily poor children of color. Instead, they use empirical evidence to determine whether charter schooling offers an authentic alternative for these children.


One of the “15 must-read books about K-12 education in the US” by The Christian Science Monitor


“Fabricant and Fine have fearlessly peered behind the ‘Waiting for Superman’ hype. Everyone interested in the future of American education needs to read this insightful analysis of how our public schools are being dismantled under the banner of reform.”

–Juan Gonzalez, New York Daily News columnist and co-host of Democracy Now!


Click here to read more reviews for this book.

Listen to an interview with Michael Fabricant and Michelle Fine on WNYC's Leonard Lopate Show

Organizing for Educational Justice

by Michael Fabricant (2010)


Organizing for Educational Justice tells the story of CC9 from its origins in 1995 as a small group of concerned parents to the citywide application of its reform agenda ten years later. As urban parents search for ways to hold public schools accountable for their failures, this book shows how the success of the CC9 experience can be replicated elsewhere around the country.


“It is impossible to read this book without having tremendous admiration for all those who participated in the Campaign--their intelligence, their caring, their perseverance, their commitment to public education. In an era where public institutions are under attack, CC9 had a vision for public spaces where ordinary citizens could exercise their essential democratic rights and responsibilities. In carving out that space, South Bronx parents were able to make schools a little more accountable to their dreams for their children.” --Eva Gold of Research for Action, Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare (Click here to read the in-depth review of this book)


Blog Review: An Urban Teacher’s Education: The Powerful Poor?

Settlement Houses Under Siege: The Struggle to Sustain Community Organizations in New York City

by Michael B. Fabricant, Robert Fisher (2001)


Settlement Houses Under Siege: The Struggle to Sustain Community Organizations in New York City examines the past, present, and future of the settlement house in particular and nonprofit community-based services as a whole. Too often viewed as an artifact of the Progressive era, the settlement house remains today, in a variety of guises, a vital instrument capable of strengthening the social capital of impoverished communities. Yet it has been under attack in recent years, particularly in New York City.


“Fabricant and Fisher have given us the gift of an imperative and rewarding study that may help to bolster and galvanize a much needed movement for community and democracy in the twenty-first century. ‘Settlement Houses Under Siege’ is a splendid antidote to these hard and bitter times.” –Blanche Wiesen Cook, Author of ‘Eleanor Roosevelt’


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The Welfare State Crisis and the Transformation of Social Service Work

by Michael B. Fabricant, Steve Burghardt (1992)


The authors explore the interplay between the implementation of cost- containment policies and the changing structure and content of social service practice, within the larger dynamics of the political economy. They explore the work patterns and practices of professional social workers currently employed in child welfare, health, and employment agencies.


"Fabricant and Burghardt have made a major and novel contribution to the literature. This is an important book which addresses a neglected topic of significance for the study of social policy." –Journal of Sociology and Welfare


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Working Under the Safety Net: Policy and Practice with the New American Poor

by Steve Burghardt, Michael Fabricant (1987)


Working Under the Safety Net focuses on groups most affected by changes in welfare state policy over the last decade -- the homeless, the hungry, the elderly, Black single mothers, the physically disabled and the new unemployed. The authors analyse the policy debate surrounding the needs of each group, synthesize the policy debate and distil the practical and organizational lessons into a new and exciting framework.


“Social policy analysts have used the term `safety net' to define the minimum level of care that government will provide for the basic human needs of its citizens. Burghardt and Fabricant have developed strategies to assist those who are falling and sometimes remaining below the welfare safety net. Included in this vulnerable population are the homeless, the hungry, older Americans, blacks, female single parents, the physically disabled, and the new unemployed. From the Great Depression to the start of the Reagan administration some form of government assistance has been provided for these groups. Since the 1980s, however, domestic policy has threatened to displace them from the government welfare system. The authors illustrate the research-policy-practice continuum used in providing direct and indirect services to each group. Examples of case and class advocacy are cited to demonstrate the wide range of skills needed by practitioners when serving these populations. The work examines the interrelationship between policy and practice that is essential for the preparation of professional workers. Highly recommended for upper-division undergraduate and graduate students in social work and human services, and for citizens concerned about the plight of the new poor.” –E.J. Norman, University of North Dakota

Juveniles in the Family Courts

by Michael Fabricant (1982)


“Over the past decade, the State of New York has radically changed its approach to and treatment of delinquents. The age of criminal responsibility has been reduced to fourteen years for serious felonies. The push is toward more severe consequences for antisocial youths as this abandonment of liberal values has become a cause celebre. ‘Juveniles in the Family Courts’ attempts to interpret this hardening of social values within the context of the history of the juvenile court. The volume is a case study of juvenile court practices and ideology.”  –James C. Weissman, The Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology (Winter, 1983)

Juvenile Injustice: Dilemmas of the Family Court System

by Michael Fabricant (1981)


This book, based on a study of delinquency cases in the Bronx and Brooklyn family courts, examines the juvenile justice system in New York City.


“In this court, the defendant is very, very, very innocent until proven guilty.”

–Michael Fabricant, New York Times (1981)


Click here to read related article about juveniles in the family courts.

Deinstitutionalizing Delinquent Youth

by Michael Fabricant (1980)


“What makes this book unique and valuable is Fabricant's utilization of the interactionist method as the basis for analyzing this implementation process. This method facilitates a multidimensional analysis of inter-and intrainstitutional tensions that occur within bureaucratic systems undergoing change. It also allows for a description of how these institutional changes affect the client and how the client adapts to them.” –Harold S. Goldman, Social Service Review (June 1983)


Click here to read full review.

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